1914-1918__________IN MEMORIUM___________1939-1945

Forgie Aitken....Lewis Aitken....John Stewart Alexander....William Bungay....Adam Graham Bunyan.....Robert McKerlie Croft...David Phillip Davidson....William Currie Ferguson Snr....William Currie Ferguson Jnr....Walter Freebairn....David Gillon....James Gillon....Ralph Colley Smith Gillon....Robert Gillon....Frederick John Hall....John Joseph Thornton Hamilton.... William Stonewall Johnson....John Knox....Robert Lambie....John Laverie....Walter Keith Loughnan....James Smythe McAdam....James Mackay.....Adrian McKerlie....James McKerlie....Donald McDonald Munro....Alexander Parker....John Stewart....John David Ross....Wentworth Frederick Scott.....Joseph Young Steele....John Jasper Spowart....James Tagg......Matthew Knowles Thorburn.....John Wilson

Home Fraser's Fathers Family Fraser's Mothers Family Anne's Photo Album

Forgie Aitken

Private in the 9th(Glasgow Highlanders).Batt.,Highland Light Infantry.Enlisted Glasgow.Service No.332756.Killed in Action 25/9/1917.Age 20. Tyne Cot Memorial,Zonnebeke,West-Vlaanderen,Belgium.Panel 131 or 132.

Son of James Aitken and Isabella Laird, 40 Broomhill Street,Port Dundas,Glasgow and grandson of Alexander Aitken and Agnes Hamilton.

Visiting Information: There are two separate registers for this site - one for the cemetery and one for the memorial. The memorial register will be found in the left hand rotunda of the memorial as you face the memorial. The Panel Numbers quoted at the end of each entry relate to the panels dedicated to the Regiment served with. In some instances where a casualty is recorded as attached to another Regiment, his name may alternatively appear within their Regimental Panels. Please refer to the on-site Memorial Register Introduction to determine the alternative panel numbers if you do not find the name within the quoted Panels. Wheelchair access to the cemetery possible via main entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on telephone number: 01628 507200 Location Information: The Tyne Cot Memorial to the Missing forms the north-eastern boundary of Tyne Cot Cemetery, which is located 9 kilometres north east of Ieper town centre, on the Tynecotstraat, a road leading from the Zonnebeekseweg (N332). The names of those from United Kingdom units are inscribed on Panels arranged by Regiment under their respective Ranks. The names of those from New Zealand units are inscribed on panels within the New Zealand Memorial Apse located at the centre of the Memorial. Historical Information: The Tyne Cot Memorial is one of four memorials to the missing in Belgian Flanders which cover the area known as the Ypres Salient. Broadly speaking, the Salient stretched from Langemarck in the north to the northern edge in Ploegsteert Wood in the south, but it varied in area and shape throughout the war. The Salient was formed during the First Battle of Ypres in October and November 1914, when a small British Expeditionary Force succeeded in securing the town before the onset of winter, pushing the German forces back to the Passchendaele Ridge. The Second Battle of Ypres began in April 1915 when the Germans released poison gas into the Allied lines north of Ypres. This was the first time gas had been used by either side and the violence of the attack forced an Allied withdrawal and a shortening of the line of defence. There was little more significant activity on this front until 1917, when in the Third Battle of Ypres an offensive was mounted by Commonwealth forces to divert German attention from a weakened French front further south. The initial attempt in June to dislodge the Germans from the Messines Ridge was a complete success, but the main assault north-eastward, which began at the end of July, quickly became a dogged struggle against determined opposition and the rapidly deteriorating weather. The campaign finally came to a close in November with the capture of Passchendaele. The German offensive of March 1918 met with some initial success, but was eventually checked and repulsed in a combined effort by the Allies in September. The battles of the Ypres Salient claimed many lives on both sides and it quickly became clear that the commemoration of members of the Commonwealth forces with no known grave would have to be divided between several different sites. The site of the Menin Gate was chosen because of the hundreds of thousands of men who passed through it on their way to the battlefields. It commemorates those of all Commonwealth nations except New Zealand who died in the Salient, in the case of United Kingdom casualties before 16 August 1917. Those United Kingdom and New Zealand servicemen who died after that date are named on the memorial at Tyne Cot, a site which marks the furthest point reached by Commonwealth forces in Belgium until nearly the end of the war. Other New Zealand casualties are commemorated on memorials at Buttes New British Cemetery and Messines Ridge British Cemetery. The TYNE COT MEMORIAL now bears the names of almost 35,000 officers and men whose graves are not known. The memorial, designed by Sir Herbert Baker with sculpture by Joseph Armitage and F V Blundstone, was unveiled by Sir Gilbert Dyett in July 1927. The memorial forms the north-eastern boundary of TYNE COT CEMETERY, which was established around a captured German blockhouse or pill-box used as an advanced dressing station. The original battlefield cemetery of 343 graves was greatly enlarged after the Armistice when remains were brought in from the battlefields of Passchendaele and Langemarck, and from a few small burial grounds. It is now the largest Commonwealth war cemetery in the world in terms of burials. At the suggestion of King George V, who visited the cemetery in 1922, the Cross of Sacrifice was placed on the original large pill-box. There are three other pill-boxes in the cemetery. There are now 11,952 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated in Tyne Cot Cemetery. 8,365 of the burials are unidentified but there are special memorials to more than 80 casualties known or believed to be buried among them. Other special memorials commemorate 20 casualties whose graves were destroyed by shell fire. The cemetery was designed by Sir Herbert Baker. No. of Identified Casualties: 34870 This figure includes Foreign and Non-World War graves in CWGC care

Lewis Aitken

Private in the 10th(Derry)(Service)Batt.Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers.Enlisted Glasgow.Service No.24676.Killed in Action 1/7/1916.Age 22. Name on Thiepval Memorial,Somme,France.

Son of James Aitken and Isabella Laird, 40 Broomhill Street,Port Dundas,Glasgow and grandson of Alexander Aitken and Agnes Hamilton.Brother of Forgie Aitken,see above.

Killed probably fighting with the Ulster Division. The Battle of Albert (first phase of the Battle of the Somme 1916) : The Ulster Division was one of those selected to make the initial assault. It was in X Corps, with 32nd Division - a New Army formation - on its right facing the height around the immensely fortified position of Thiepval, and the regular army 29th Division, recently arrived from Gallipoli, facing Beaumont Hamel on the other bank of the Ancre. The Ulster Division faced an uphill advance, with the objective of capturing a large strongpoint complex in the enemy lines, called the Schwaben redoubt. The Divisions attack on 1 July 1916 has been covered by writers in immense detail, and has entered into Ulster folklore as a day of enduring memory. Overall the day was one of significant defeat for the British Army, when more than 57,000 men became casualties, of whom 20,000 were killed. However, it is often forgotten that three Divisions captured their objectives, and that several others while not doing so did perform exceptional feats. The Ulster Division was one of them: it captured and held for a considerable time the Schwaben Redoubt, despite virtually no progress being made by either Division on its flanks

John Stewart Alexander

Private in the 1st.Batt.King's Own Scottish Borderers.Service No.16240.Killed in action 14/7/1916.Age 22.Name on Thiepval Memorial,Somme,France.He is mentioned on the gravestone of his paternal grandparents,"He fell in the charge at Longueval"

Son of David Alexander and Elizabeth Stewart and grandson of John Stewart and Elizabeth Gillon.

The Battle of Bazentin Ridge, 1916 A subsidiary attack of the Somme Offensive, and having captured Mametz Wood on 12 July, the British moved onwards toward High Wood in a continuation of the push through German lines. The Battle of Bazentin Ridge, which ran from 14-17 July 1916 and comprised part of the second phase of the Somme Offensive, was launched primarily by Reserve Army (twelve battalions) with Rawlinson's Fourth Army providing a further battalion, on a front extending from Longueval to Bazentin-le-Petit Wood. Opened at dawn on the 14th (unusually so; Douglas Haig, the British Commander-in-Chief, was suspicious of night attacks), and preceded by a short sharp five minute artillery bombardment - just enough time to send exposed German defenders to their dugouts - the infantry moved forward. A notable success, Bazentin-le-Grand and Bazentin-le-Petit were secured with a matter of hours, with Longueval (skirting Delville Wood) following shortly afterwards

Adam Graham Bunyan

Rank:Private Service No:31886 Date of Death:03/05/1917 Age:21 Regiment/Service:Machine Gun Corps (Infantry) 193rd Coy. Grave Reference:I. F. 17.Cemetery:TILLOY BRITISH CEMETERY, TILLOY-LES-MOFFLAINES.

Son of John Bunyan and Mary Stark Bunyan, of A. I. Fallin, Stirling. Native of Sandy Knowe, Coylton, Ayrshire.

Country:FranceLocality:Pas de CalaisIdentified Casualties:1031 Location Information Tilloy-les-Mofflaines is a village 3 kilometres south-east of Arras, on the south side of the main road to Cambrai. Tilloy British Cemetery is south-east of the village on the north-east side of the road to Wancourt, the D37. Visiting Information Update 28/01/15 : Access to the above Cemetery is restricted due to ground subsidence. Wheelchair access to this site is possible by an alternative entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on 01628 507200. Historical Information Tilloy-Les-Mofflaines was taken by Commonwealth troops on 9 April 1917, but it was partly in German hands again from March to August 1918. The cemetery was begun in April 1917 by fighting units and burial officers, and Rows A to H in Plot I largely represent burials from the battlefield. The remaining graves in Plot I, and others in the first three rows of Plot II, represent later fighting in 1917 and the first three months of 1918, and the clearing of the village in August 1918. These 390 original burials were increased after the Armistice when graves were brought in from a wide area east of Arras and from the following smaller burial grounds:- ARTILLERY TRACK CEMETERY, ARRAS, in which were buried 39 soldiers from the United Kingdom who fell on the 9th and 10th April 1917; CHAPEL ROAD CEMETERY, WANCOURT, midway between Feuchy Chapel and Neuville-Vitasse, where 34 soldiers from the United Kingdom were buried in April 1917; HARP REDOUBT CEMETERY, TILLOY-LES-MOFFLAINES, close to a German fort on the South side of the village which was taken by the 14th (Light) Division and Tanks on the 9th April 1917. The cemetery contained the graves of 36 soldiers of the K.R.R.C. and 51 others from the United Kingdom; MAISON-ROUGE BRITISH CEMETERY, TILLOY-LES-MOFFLAINES (near a house on the main road to Cambrai), which contained the graves of 89 soldiers from the United Kingdom, 14 from South Africa, one from Canada and one from New Zealand, and 13 German soldiers. This cemetery was used in 1917 and again in March, April and August 1918; TEES TRENCH CEMETERIES No.1 and No.2, ST. LAURENT-BLANGY (near the road to Bailleul), in which were buried 32 soldiers from the United Kingdom who fell, with two exceptions, on the 9th April 1917; TELEGRAPH HILL BRITISH CEMETERY, NEUVILLE-VITASSE, on the South-Western slopes of the hill between Tilloy and Neuville-Vitasse, captured by the 14th Division on the 9th April 1917. The cemetery contained the graves of 147 soldiers from the United Kingdom, almost all of whom belonged to the 14th Division and fell in April 1917; TILLOY WOOD CEMETERY, on the Western side of the village, containing the graves of 80 soldiers from the United Kingdom who fell in April 1917; WHITE HOUSE CEMETERY, TILLOY-LES-MOFFLAINES, close to a house on the Cambrai road, contained the graves of 22 soldiers from the United Kingdom who fell on the 11th-12th April 1917. The cemetery now contains 1,642 Commonwealth burials and commemorations of the First World War. 611 of the burials are unidentified, but there are special memorials to 14 casualties known or believed to be buried among them. Other special memorials commemorate 11 men of the 6th Bn. K.O.S.B., buried in Tees Trench Cemetery No.2, whose graves were destroyed by shell fire. The cemetery was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens.

William Bungay

Flight Sergeant in the Royal Australian Air Force.Service No.417989.Died 26/1/1944.Buried Nowra War Cemetery Plot B.Row B.Grave 6.

Son of Arthur Bungay and Elizabeth McKerlie and grandson of Robert McKerlie and Mary Hannah.

NOWRA WAR CEMETERY Country: Australia Locality: New South Wales Visiting Information: NOWRA WAR CEMETERY Index No. AUS. 238 Although in the district called South Coast, Nowra is actually on the south-eastern coast of the continent at the mouth of the Shoalhaven River. It is on Pacific Highway, 101 miles by road south-south-west of Sydney. During the war there was a Royal Naval Air Station and a Torpedo Bomber Training Establishment of the Royal Australian Air Force at Nowra; and No. 73 Squadron, Royal Australian Air Force was for a time based there while engaged upon reconnaissance and anti-submarine patrol. Nowra General Cemetery is situated on the corner of Kalander Street and Princes Highway, a mile south of Nowra post office. During the early part of the war the Military Authorities arranged for ground to be set aside especially for service war graves. This is now War Cemetery. It has its own entrance on Kalander Street, and is separated from the rest of the cemetery by an enclosing fence. There are altogether 37 war graves in this cemetery, of which 32 are the graves of airmen, including nine belonging to the Royal Navy (Fleet Air Arm). All save two of the graves are in the War Cemetery. No. of Identified Casualties: 35

Robert McKerlie Croft

Flying Officer in the Royal Australian Air Force.Service No.407199.Died 11/5/1944.Buried Wevelgem Communal Cemetery Grave E.469.

Son of William Croft and Margaret McKerlie and grandson of Robert McKerlie and Mary Hannah

WEVELGEM COMMUNAL CEMETERY Country: Belgium Locality: Wevelgem, West-Vlaanderen Visiting Information: Wheelchair access possible via main entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Department on telephone number: 01628 634221 Location Information: Wevelgem Communal Cemetery is located 22 Km east of Ieper town centre on the Meenseweg N8, connecting Ieper to Menen (Menin), Wevelgem and onto Kortrijk. Wevelgem is approached via the Meenseweg N8. From Ieper town centre the Meenseweg is located via Torhoutstraat and then right onto Basculestraat. Basculestraat ends at a main crossroads, directly over which begins the Meenseweg. The cemetery itself is located on the junction with the Moorselestraat and is accessed from the N8 Vanackerstraat. Historical Information: The British Expeditionary Force was involved in the later stages of the defence of Belgium following the German invasion in May 1940, and suffered many casualties in covering the withdrawal to Dunkirk. Commonwealth forces did not return until September 1944, but in the intervening years, many airmen were shot down or crashed in raids on strategic objectives in Belgium, or while returning from missions over Germany. Wevelgem Communal Cemetery contains the graves of 63 Commonwealth airmen of the Second World War. Elsewhere in the cemetery there are three First World War burials. No. of Identified Casualties: 64

David Phillips Davidson

Private in the17th.Batt.Highland Light Infantry.Enlisted Prestwick,Ayrshire.Service No.23061.Killed in Action 1/7/1916.Age 19.Buried Lonsdale Cemetery,Authuile,Somme,France.Grave III.F.7.Probably killed in the attack on the Leipzig trench.

Son of John and Martha Davidson,Invereck,Prestwick,Ayr.Grandson of Joseph Walker Davidson and Margaret Grier

Authuille is a village 5 kilometres north of the town of Albert on the D151 road to Grandcourt. The Cemetery (signposted in the centre of Authille) is 1 kilometre east of the village. Access to the cemetery, 500 metres from the road, is by a grass pathway (unsuitable for cars). Historical Information: On 1 July 1916, the first day of the Battle of the Somme, the 32nd Division, which included the 1st Dorsets and the 11th (Lonsdale) Battalion of the Border Regt attacked the German line at this point and stormed the Leipzig Salient, but were compelled to retire later in the day. In the spring of 1917, after the German withdrawal to the Hindenburg Line, V Corps cleared these battlefields and made a number of new cemeteries, including Lonsdale No. 1 and No. 2. Lonsdale Cemetery No. 1 (the present Lonsdale Cemetery) contained originally 96 graves (now in Plot I), the great majority of which were those of officers and men of the 1st Dorsets and the 11th Borders. It was enlarged after the Armistice when graves, almost all of 1916, were brough in from the surrounding battlefields and from other small burial grounds, including Lonsdale No. 2. Lonsdale Cemetery now contains 1,542 Commonwealth burials and commemorations of the First World War. 816 of the burials are unidentified but there are special memorials to 22 casualties known or believed to be buried among them. The cemetery was designed by Sir Herbert Baker. No. of Identified Casualties: 727 This figure includes Foreign .

William Currie Ferguson

Private in the 1st/7th.Batt.,Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders.Born Dumfries.Enlisted Tillicoultry,ClackmananshireService No.S/16319.Died of Wounds. 27/7/1918.Age 37.Buried Sezanne Communal Cemetery,Haute-Marne,France.Grave C.17.

Husband of Betsy McIntosh Nicolson,the daughter of Donald Nicolson and Annie Macrae.

Location Information: The town of Sezanne is approximately 100 kilometres east of Paris on the main road to Nancy and about 60 kilometres south of Reims. The town of Sezanne is best reached from either direction of the N4 road, by turning onto the RD51, following signs for Sezanne. After about five hundred metres turn right again following the same signs. At a road junction with traffic lights turn right following the signs for centre ville and Epernay, continue through the town centre until a right turn signposted Broyes and Vertus (rue de Broyes). After a short distance take a left fork in the road also signposted Broyes and Vertus, at the next road junction it is necessary to continue straight over again following the signs for Broyes and Vertus. After a short distance the cemetery can be found on the left side of the road. The CWGC plot is located to the rear of the civil cemetery. Historical Information: French medical units were at Sezanne from September 1914 onwards, and of the 32nd Casualty Clearing Station in June and July 1918. The communal cemetery contains a plot of 127 Commonwealth burials of the First World War, four of them unidentified. No. of Identified Casualties: 123

William Currie Ferguson

Sergeant,Wireless Operator/Air Gunner 11 Sq.,Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve.Service No.973780.Died 13/6/1941.Age 29.Buried Beirut War Cemetery,Lebabon.Grave 1.l.8.

Son of William Currie Ferguson and Betsy Nicolson,Alva,Clackmannanshire.

BEIRUT WAR CEMETERY Country: Lebanese Republic Locality: unspecified Visiting Information: The cemetery is open Monday to Friday and Saturday morning. Closed all day Sunday. Wheelchair access possible via main entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our enquiries department on telephone number 01628 634221. Location Information: Beirut War Cemetery is located approximately 2-3 kilometres from the centre of Beirut in the El Horj district on Rue Jalloul, which runs west of Avenue de Novembre which is next to a park known as the Forest of Pines. The cemetery is in two sections, bisected by Rue Jalloul. Historical Information: Lebanon was taken from the Turks in 1918 by Commonwealth forces with small French and Arab detachments. Beirut was occupied by the 7th (Meerut) Division on 8 October 1918 when French warships were already in the harbour, and the 32nd and 15th Combined Clearing Hospitals were sent to the town. In 1922 Syria and Lebanon became French mandated territory and after the fall of France in 1940, the two countries, under the control of the Vichy French, were a potential base for the Axis powers. The Germans infiltrated Syria in May 1941 posing a threat to the Suez Canal and the Allied positions in the Middle East. In an attempt to neutralise this threat, the Allies, including a contingent of Free French forces, advanced into both countries from Palestine on 8 June 1941. The campaign lasted until 11 July, when the Vichy French asked for an armistice. Subsequently the French Mandate was superseded by an agreement which made Lebanon an independent state from 1 January 1944. Beirut War Cemetery is in two sections. One section, originally known as Beirut British War Cemetery, was begun in October 1918 and was later enlarged when graves were brought in from other burial grounds in the area. The older part of the adjoining section, originally known as Beirut (Saida Road) Indian and Egyptian Cemetery, contains three memorials to soldiers of the Indian army and the Egyptian Labour Corps who died during the First World War. This section was later extended for Second World War burials, and the two sections combined under the name of Beirut War Cemetery. Commonwealth burials and commemorations at BEIRUT WAR CEMETERY now total 628 for the First World War and 531 for the Second World War. The cemetery also contains a number of war graves of other nationalities, many of them Greek and Turkish. A further 251 Indian casualties of the Second World War are commemorated on the BEIRUT CREMATION MEMORIAL which stands within the cemetery. No. of Identified Casualties: 1202

Walter Freebairn

Sapper,Australian Engineers,Unit 1st Field Coy. Age: 24 Date of Death: 25/04/1915 Service No: 55 Grave/Memorial Reference: I. C. 19. Cemetery: SHRAPNEL VALLEY CEMETERY

Son of William Freebairn and Isabella Logan.Grandson of James Logan and Agnes Tagg.

Cemetery: SHRAPNEL VALLEY CEMETERY Country: Turkey Locality: unspecified Visiting Information: The location or design of this site, makes wheelchair access impossible. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on telephone number 01628 507200. Location Information: The Anzac and Sulva cemeteries are first signposted from the left hand junction of the Eceabat - Bigali Road. From this junction you travel into the main Anzac area. After 10.1 km's you take a right turn along a short track to find the cemetery on your left. Shrapnel Valley (or Shrapnel Gully) runs from the west side of the Lone Pine Plateau, behind Maclagan's Ridge, south-westwards to the sea near Hell Spit (Queensland Point). Historical Information: The eight month campaign in Gallipoli was fought by Commonwealth and French forces in an attempt to force Turkey out of the war, to relieve the deadlock of the Western Front in France and Belgium, and to open a supply route to Russia through the Dardanelles and the Black Sea. The Allies landed on the peninsula on 25-26 April 1915; the 29th Division at Cape Helles in the south and the Australian and New Zealand Corps north of Gaba Tepe on the west coast, an area soon known as Anzac. Shrapnel Valley was an essential road from the beach up to the Anzac front and took its name from the heavy shelling it was given by the Turks on 26 April 1915. Wells were sunk there and water obtained in small quantities, and there were camps and depots on the south side of its lower reaches. Gun positions were made near its mouth. The cemetery was made mainly during the occupation, but some isolated graves were brought in from the valley after the Armistice. There are now 683 Commonwealth servicemen buried or commemorated in this cemetery. 85 of the burials are unidentified but special memorials commemorate 23 casualties known or believed to be buried among them. No. of Identified Casualties: 598

David Gillan

Private 85th.Batt.Canadian Army(Nova Scotia Regiment).Service No.877467.Killed 5Mar1919 Kimmel Park,Flintshire,Wales.Age 20.Buried Bodelwyddan(St.Margaret)Churchyard,Flintshire.

Son of John Gillon and Emily Grey of Florence,Cape Breton,Nova Scotia and gt.gt.gt.grandson of John Gillon and Grace Simpson.

Canadian soldiers' deaths a mystery The Kinmel Park riots, a deadly secret in north Wales By KEVIN WARD-- The Canadian Press BODELWYDDAN, Wales (CP) -- The March wind whips through the Marble Church graveyard. Bitingly cold and from the north, it gusts off the rolling grey Irish Sea, pushing a steady rain sideways. After surviving slaughter amid the mud of the trenches of the First World War, this part of north Wales was the last place Canadian soldiers eager to return home wanted to spend the winter of 1918-19. Yet for 83 Canadians, Bodelwyddan would be their final resting place. Most of the men who lie in the graveyard alongside the bustling A55 highway were victims of a deadly outbreak of influenza. But the deaths of five of the veterans are not so easily explained, and even 82 years later are shrouded in mystery. It's known they were killed in a mutiny that ended on March 5, 1919, a sad and bloody episode in Canadian history. But how Canadian soldiers ended up shooting their comrades in anger still raises many unanswered questions. Over the years the stories that have been told and retold locally of the Kinmel Park riots have had a tenuous link with the truth. "It's a Chinese whisper sort of thing," says Rev. Berw Hughes of St. Margaret's Church, also known as the Marble Church because of the amount of marble lining its interior. For a long time it was thought that the Canadians had been executed for their role in the mutiny. According to church history, this story was first dispelled by a Toronto lawyer who, on a visit to Wales, heard a tour guide tell of how the Canadian soldiers were sentenced to death for their role in a mutiny. When he returned to Canada, he did his own research to get to the truth about the deaths of the 83. While mutinies among British and Canadian soldiers were not unknown, Kinmel Park was unusual because it ended in bloodshed and death in an uprising among largely white troops. "If it's white troops against white troops, or white troops against white officers, it's very rare that anybody is punished or dies," says Julian Putkowski, a lecturer at Kings College in London who has studied military mutinies. SOLDIERS EXECUTED? "You can pick the number who have been executed off the fingers of less than one hand.... If you look at black troops, well it (death toll) runs into the hundreds." Stretching across a low hill overlooking the village of Bodelwyddan (pronounced boh-del-WIH-dehn), the camp at Kinmel Park was ill-suited to handle a shifting population of 19,000 soldiers from the Canadian Expeditionary Force. The men were itching to board boats for Halifax and St. John. They were told there weren't enough boats to transport them, but many waited longer than seemed fair. In Canada there were worries over unemployment and doubts about the railway's ability to cope with the demobilized soldiers fanning out across the country. Putkowski says the men knew the longer they were kept in north Wales, the worse their chances of finding work, adding to their anxiety about being held back. American troops, meanwhile, were getting boats bound for the United States straight from France without having to go through Britain, despite the fact they hadn't fought as long as the Canadians. The old military training camp was an unhappy place. Canadian soldiers, well paid compared to their British counterparts, were gouged in the civilian-run temporary shops, known as Tintown. The weather was bad and the men, on the cusp of civilian life, still faced a disciplined military routine of marches and inspections. Then, a couple of days before the riots, ships meant to carry men from the camp to Canada were reassigned to another division. "Many men were broke and couldn't buy cigarettes or soap but were all looking forward to get away home," one soldier told a court inquiry into the riot. STUCK IN WALES Then came the cancellation of the sailings.... On the day before the riot it was on everyone's lips." Putkowski says the men were bolstered in their resolve by British troops who had won early demobilization by going on strike three months before. "That's the little spark," he says. "The authorities had given way." The riots began on the night of March 4 in a wet canteen among about 60 men, then grew as gangs broke into the sergeants' and officers' messes. Later, Tintown was looted, the target of a revenge attack against the profiteers. By 3 a.m., six hours after the trouble began, the camp was quiet. "As dawn broke on 5 March, Kinmel Park Camp must have seemed a melancholy sight to military eyes," Putkowski wrote in his book on the riots. "Thousands of pounds worth of food, drink, tobacco, clothing, bedding and equipment had been stolen or destroyed." Camp commanders organized soldiers to help keep the peace the next day, but they were soon confronted by gangs of men who set about freeing prisoners from the night before. To ease tensions, the prisoners were ordered released, but it did no good. Cavalry also failed to quell the rioting and was met with volleys of rocks and sticks from the mutineers. As the fighting intensified, more men were injured and the first fatalities were recorded. Sapper William Tarasevitch, 30, was bayoneted in the abdomen and died. Corp. Joseph Young, 36, died in hospital after being hacked in the face with a bayonet. The third man killed was Pte. David Gillan, 22, who had been enlisted to defend the camp. He was shot in the back of the neck. The final two fatalities were Signaller William Haney, who was hit by a bullet in the face, and Gunner Jack Hickman, hit in the chest by a ricochet bullet. When it was over, 28 men had been injured, eight of them suffering gunshot wounds, including the three who died. 41 FACED COURTS MARTIAL Putkowski believes the shots that were fired that day were largely indiscriminate. Questions also remain about where all the firing came from, especially since all ammunition in the camp was ordered locked up. Forty-one soldiers faced courts martial for mutiny. Seventeen were acquitted. The longest sentence among the convicted was 10 years in prison, although most of the men had their sentences reduced, and even the man facing 10 years was allowed to return to Canada by November 1919. None of the inquiries held into the riots produced conclusive findings on who was responsible. That's no surprise to Putkowski. "There is a shared interest in not disturbing the dust too much," he says. For mutineers, uncovering the truth could mean convictions, and officers feared proof that they had lost control of their troops. "Kinmel Park is part of the small unfinished business of the First World War," says Putkowski. David Gillan's gravestone at St. Margaret's stands out from the others, erected in "proud memory" of the young man from Cape Breton. It rises close to two metres high, is topped with a large cross and is inscribed with the words "killed at Kinmel Park on March 5, 1919, defending the honor of his country." The stones of the other four men killed in the riots resemble the low white markers bearing the Maple Leaf seen at Canadian war graves across Europe. On Joseph Young's gravestone is the message: "Sometime, sometime we'll understand." STILL ATTRACT LOCAL ATTENTION The riots still attract local attention. Bus tours stop by the church and tourists wander between the neatly kept war graves. The village council holds an annual Remembrance Day service. Two plastic poppy wreaths sat undisturbed last week at the foot of Gillan's gravemarker. Richard Bunny, a member of the council, thinks the many stories surrounding the deaths add to people's curiosity. "It probably makes a better story than the reality of it," he says. The vicar, Berw Hughes, says visitors often want to make sense of what happened. "They can't understand why." Wally Forster is the caretaker at what's left of Kinmel Park, now used for cadet training. During his 35 years at the camp, he has maintained a keen interest in the events of March 5, 1919. "I don't think the truth has ever been told," he says between sips from a pint at the village pub. "There's a lot that was never said." But there is one thing of which he is certain. The whole thing would have been prevented if the men had been allowed to return home. "They were only young boys," he says with a sigh. "It's a hell of a tragic story.

James Gillon

Driver in the Royal Field Artillery C Bty 87th.Brigade.Killed 22/3/1916 Age 24 Service No.709.Buried Grave/Memorial Reference: II. U. 11. Cemetery: ST. VAAST POST MILITARY CEMETERY, RICHEBOURG-L'AVOUE.

Son of Robert Gillon and Margaret McArthur,15 Central Ave,Viewpark,Uddingston. Gt.gt.grandson of John Gillon and Grace Simpson.

The cemetery lies near the village of Richebourg-l'Avoue which is 9 kilometres north-east of Bethune. From Bethune follow the D.171 toward Armentieres and progress onto the D.166 proceeding into the outskirts of Richebourg. Take a left turning into Rue des Charbonniers for approximately 2 kilometres and the cemetery is on the right hand side. Historical Information: Richebourg-L'Avoue village remained in British hands from the Autumn of 1914 to the 9th April, 1918, though the front line was within 1.6 kilometres of it. It was recovered in September, 1918. The strong point from which the cemetery was named was in turn named from the hamlet of St. Vaast, between the village of Richebourg-St. Vaast and Goix-Barbee. It stands in an old orchard between two farm buildings, where a trench tramway had its terminus and a Dressing Station was established. It was begun in May, 1915, at the time of the Battle of Festubert, and used by fighting units and Field Ambulances until July, 1917. In April and May, 1918, the Germans buried 90 of their men at the South-East end, and in September and October, 1918, 18 further British dead were buried in Plot V. Eleven Portuguese soldiers buried here in May-July, 1917, have been removed to the Portuguese Military Cemetery. There are now nearly 800, 1914-18 war casualties commemorated in this site. Of these, a small number are unidentified. Special memorials are erected to three soldiers from the United Kingdom, buried in the cemetery, whose graves cannot now be traced. There are 91 German burials here, 34 being unidentified. The cemetery covers an area of 4,080 square metres and is enclosed by a flint wall.

Ralph Colley Smith Gillon

Rank:Private Service No:62 Date of Death:18/07/1916 Reported missing Derville Wood,France.Age:35 Regiment/Service:South African Infantry 2nd Regt. Panel Reference:Pier and Face 4 C.Memorial:THIEPVAL MEMORIAL Additional Information:Son of William Gillon and Mary Anderson, of Longrow, Campbeltown, Argyllshire.On Saturday 15 July, as the fighting for Longueval continued, the South African Brigade were tasked with securing Delville Wood. Attacking with great determination at 6.15am they rapidly cleared the southern sector, despite the difficulties posed by tangled undergrowth, fallen trees and shell craters; a second advance took them almost to the wood's north-west edge, where they dug in. The Germans retaliated with ceaseless shelling, machine gun fire, and a succession of aggressive counter-attacks. Fighting continued by night and day as renewed South African assaults wore themselves out against German defences. On 18 July heavy rain and German counter-attacks forced critical withdrawals but it was not until the evening of 20 July, after six days of continuous fighting, that the South Africans were relieved

Robert Gillon

Private in the 2nd.Battalion Kings Own Scottish Borderers.Killed in Belgium. 4/10/1917 Age 23 Service No.40892.Buried Enclosure No.4 III. G. 15. BEDFORD HOUSE CEMETERY,BELGIUM.

Son of Mrs.Agnes Gillon,Balerno,Midlothian. Gt.gt.grandson of John Gillon and Grace Simpson.

Bedford House Cemetery is located 2.5 Km south of Ieper town centre. The cemetery lies on the Rijselseweg (N336), the road connecting Ieper to Armentieres. From Ieper town centre the Rijselsestraat runs from the market square, through the Lille Gate (Rijselpoort) and directly over the crossroads with the Ieper ring road. The road name then changes to the Rijselseweg. The cemetery itself is located 2 Km after this crossroads on the left hand side of the Rijselseweg. Historical Information: Zillebeke village and most of the commune were in the hands of Commonwealth forces for the greater part of the First World War, but the number of cemeteries in the neighbourhood bears witness to the fierce fighting in the vicinity from 1914 to 1918. Bedford House, sometimes known as Woodcote House, were the names given by the Army to the Chateau Rosendal, a country house in a small wooded park with moats. Although it never fell into German hands, the house and the trees were gradually destroyed by shell fire. It was used by field ambulances and as the headquarters of brigades and other fighting units, and charcoal pits were dug there from October 1917. In time, the property became largely covered by small cemeteries; five enclosures existed at the date of the Armistice, but the graves from No.1 were then removed to White House Cemetery, St. Jean, and those from No.5 to Aeroplane Cemetery, Ypres. ENCLOSURE No.2 was begun in December 1915, and used until October 1918. After the Armistice, 437 graves were added, all but four of which came from the Ecole de Bienfaisance and Asylum British Cemeteries, both at Ypres. ENCLOSURE No.3, the smallest, was used from February 1915 to December 1916; the burials made in August-October 1915 were largely carried out by the 17th Division. ENCLOSURE No.4, the largest, was used from June 1916 to February 1918, largely by the 47th (London) Division, and after the Armistice it was enlarged when 3,324 graves were brought in from other burial grounds and from the battlefields of the Ypres Salient. Almost two-thirds of the graves are unidentified. ENCLOSURE No.6 was made in the 1930s from the graves that were continuing to be found on the battlefield of the Ypres Salient. This enclosure also contains Second World War burials, all of them soldiers of the British Expeditionary Force, who died in the defence of the Ypres-Comines canal and railway at the end of May 1940. The canal lies on high ground on the west side of the cemetery. The following were burial grounds from which British graves were concentrated to Bedford House:- ASYLUM BRITISH CEMETERY, YPRES, was established in the grounds of a mental hospital (the Hospice du Sacre Coeur) a little West of the railway station, between the Poperinghe road and the railway. It was used by Field Ambulances and fighting units from February, 1915, to November, 1917, and it contained the graves of 265 soldiers from the United Kingdom, nine from Canada, seven from Australia and two of the British West Indies Regiment. BOESINGHE FRENCH CEMETERY No.2, a little South of Bard Cottage, contained the grave of one soldier from the United Kingdom. DROOGENBROODHOEK GERMAN CEMETERY, MOORSLEDE, contained the graves of two United Kingdom soldiers who fell in October, 1914. ECOLE DE BIENFAISANCE CEMETERY, YPRES, was on the North side of the Poperinghe road, immediately West of the railway, in the grounds of a school (later rebuilt). It was used by Field Ambulances in 1915-1917, and it contained the graves of 133 soldiers from the United Kingdom, three from Canada, three from Australia and one of the British West Indies Regiment. KERKHOVE CHURCHYARD contained the graves of five United Kingdom soldiers, who fell in October and November, 1918, and seven German. POELCAPELLE GERMAN CEMETERY No.4, between Langemarck and the Poelcapelle-St. Julien road, contained the graves of 52 soldiers from the United Kingdom who fell in 1914 and 1916. ZONNEBEKE BRITISH CEMETERIES No.1 and No.3 were on the South and North sides respectively of the Broodseinde-Zonnebeke road. Zonnebeke was occupied by the Germans on the 22nd October, 1914, retaken by the French on the following day, and evacuated at the beginning of May, 1915; retaken by British troops on the 26th September, 1917; evacuated again in April, 1918; and retaken by Belgian troops on the 28th September, 1918. Four British Cemeteries were made by the Germans on the Broodseinde-Zonnebeke road; No.1 contained the graves of 31 United Kingdom soldiers (mainly 2nd East Surrey) who fell in April, 1915, and No.3 those of 69 who fell in April, and May, 1915. In all, 5,139 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War are buried or commemorated in the enclosures of Bedford House Cemetery. 3,011 of the burials are unidentified but special memorials commemorate a number of casualties known or believed to be buried among them. Other special memorials name casualties buried in other cemeteries whose graves could not be found on concentration. Second World War burials number 69 (3 of which are unidentified). There are 2 Germans buried here.

Frederick John Hall

Private in the 47th Bn.Canadian Infantry (Western Ontario Regiment).Enlisted for army 17Jun1915.Killed 29/3/1917 Age 20 Service No.628060.Buried VII. G. 4. Cemetery: VILLERS STATION CEMETERY, VILLERS-AU-BO a village in the Department of the Pas-de-Calais, 11 kilometres north-west of Arras.

Son of Frederick Anson Hall and Mary Munro of Eburne,British Columbia.. Gt.gt.grandson of George Munro and Catherine Fraser.

VILLERS STATION CEMETERY, VILLERS-AU-BOIS Country: France Locality: unspecified Location Information: Villers-au-Bois is a village in the Department of the Pas-de-Calais, 11 kilometres north-west of Arras. The Cemetery is about 2 kilometres north-west of the village along a track from the Villers-au-Bois to Servins road (D65). Historical Information: This cemetery was begun by the French but was used by Commonwealth divisions and field ambulances from the time they took over this part of the front in July 1916 until September 1918. It is associated particularly with the Canadian Corps whose headquarters were nearby and many of the graves in Plots V to X date from April 1917 and the Battle of Vimy Ridge. After the Armistice, a few graves were brought in from isolated positions in the neighbourhood and in June 1923, the French graves were removed, the great majority to Notre Dame-de-Lorette French National Cemetery. Villers Station Cemetery now contains 1,208 Commonwealth burials of the First World War and 32 German war graves. The cemetery was designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield.

John Joseph Thornton Hamilton

Private in the 2nd.Batt.,Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders.Born Govan.Enlisted Glasgow,Maryhill Barracks.Service No.S/16430.Killed in Action 23/4/1917.Age 25.Buried Heninel-Croisilles Cemetery,France.

Son of John Hamilton and Helen McWilliam,Scotstoun,Glasgow.

Heninel and Croisilles are villages approximately 5 kilometres and 8 kilometres south-west of Arras (D33), in the valleys of the Cojeul and the Sensee respectively, and they are joined by a road which crosses a high plateau. On the eastern side of that road, nearer to Heninel, is the Heninel-Croisilles Road Cemetery which is approached down a 2 kilometre track. Historical Information: The 21st Division captured Heninel on 12 April 1917 and advanced eastwards on the two following days. The 33rd Division then took over the attack. These two divisions are largely represented in the cemetery. In April 1918 this ground was lost, and the eleven German graves in Plot I, Rows D and E, were made when the cemetery was in German hands. After the Armistice, graves were brought in from a wide area round Heninel. The cemetery now contains 307 Commonwealth burials of the First World War, 104 of them unidentified. The cemetery was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens. No. of Identified Casualties: 211

Charles Blackley Hamilton

Rank:Flying Officer Trade:Navigator/Radar OperatorService No:174685 Date of Death:13/04/1945 Age:23 Regiment/Service:Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve 85 Sqdn. Awards:D F C Grave Reference:10A. C. 15.Cemetery:HAMBURG CEMETERY.

Son of James and Sarah Hamilton, of West Drumullan, Girvan, Ayrshire.

Charles Blackley Hamilton of Girvan, Ayrshire joined the RAF about June 1940 as an Aircrafthand. He volunteered for aircrew duties and probably went on a short radar course at Yatesbury. In early September 1940 Hamilton joined 219 Squadron at Catterick as a Radar Operator. In October 1943 Hamilton was serving as Warrant Officer with 85 Squadron at West Malling. In the late evening of the 15th he was flying with F/O HB Thomas when they shot down a Ju188, which crashed at St Nicholas-at-Wade, Kent. Commissioned in February 1944, Hamilton was awarded the DFC (gazetted 26th September 1944). He had then assisted in the destruction of four enemy aircraft. Hamilton was still with 85 Squadron when he was killed on 13th April 1945. Mosquito NFXXX NT494 took off from Swannington but in the early hours of the 14th was shot down by a night-fighter off the north coast of Germany. The details are still unclear but it seems that the pilot, now F/Lt. HB Thomas, survived wounded but evaded capture until liberated in Kiel while Hamilton was killed, aged 23. Hamilton's body was recovered and he is buried in Hamburg Cemetery, Ohlsdorf, Germany Date: 14-APR-1945

Location Information Hamburg is a large city in the north of Germany, approx 150kms to the north of Hannover. Hamburg Ohlsdorf Cemetery (Friedhof Ohlsdorf) is the biggest non-military cemetery in the world. There are 3 Commonwealth War Graves plots located within Hamburg Ohlsdorf Cemetery:- Hamburg Cemetery Ohlsdorf 1914-1918 / Hamburg Cemetery Ohlsdorf 1939-1945 / Hamburg Cemetery Ohlsdorf Post War. From the A7 Hannover to Hamburg motorway take exit 23 (Ausfahrt 23) B432 NORDERSTEDT / HAMBURG AIRPORT / LANGENHORN. Follow the signs for B432 HAMBURG AIRPORT / LANGENHORN along the OLDESLOERSTRASSE. After approx 1.5kms keep right onto the B433 SWEBENWEG and continue to follow the signs for HAMBURG AIRPORT / LANGENHORN. Continue for approx 1.5kms and keep left onto the KROHNSTEIG for approx 2.5kms until the junction with LAGENHORNER CHAUSEE. Turn right onto the LAGENHORNER CHAUSEE and continue for approx 2kms. Turn left onto ERDKAMPSEWEG direction BARMBEK and continue for approx 2kms, during which the road name changes to RATSMUHLENDAMM and then FUHLBUTTLERSTRASSE. Immediately before the railway bridge turn right (signposted FRIEDHOF OHLSDORF) onto IM GRUNEN GRUNDE and continue for approx 500m. Turn left onto ALSTERDORFER STRASSE, go under the railway bridge and continue for 200m to the junction with FUHLBUTTLERSTRASSE. The main entrance to Hamburg Ohlsdorf Cemetery (Friedhof Ohlsdorf) is directly in front of you. The 3 Commonwealth War Graves plots are located approx 3kms from the main entrance and are clearly signposted. Follow direction for KAPELLE 12 for approx 2.5kms along the CORDESALLEE / SUDALLEE / MITTELALLEE, turn right and continue past KAPELLE 12, turn right onto LARCHENALLEE and after approx 300m the cemeteries can be found on the left and right. Visitors are advised that there is a strictly controlled 30km/hour speed limit within the boundaries of Hamburg Ohlsdorf Cemetery (Friedhof Ohlsdorf). Please note also that it is illegal to turn left from FUHLBUTTLERSTRASSE into the Hamburg Ohlsdorf Cemetery (Friedhof Ohlsdorf)

William Stonewall Johnson

Nationality: South African Rank: Burgher Regiment/Service: Mounted Commandos, S.A. Forces Unit Text: Geyser's Commando Date of Death: 08/11/1914 Killed at Zandfontein Farm,Waterburg District.

Husband of Mary McNally.Mary born 1891 Glenluce was the daughter of Richard McNally and Mary McKerlie

Commonwealth War Dead Grave/Memorial Reference: British Garden of Remembrance. Cemetery: POLOKWANE (OR PIETERSBURG) CEMETERY POLOKWANE (OR PIETERSBURG) CEMETERY Country: South Africa Locality: unspecified Location Information: The town cemetery is located fronting onto Dahl Street. The war graves are in the old section between Grobler Street and Jorrisen Street. Historical Information: No 26 Air School, of the Empire Training Scheme was established here during the Second World War. The three casualties of the First World War buried here in the British Gardens of Remembrance were originaly buried at Warmbaths but mistakenly exhumed and re-intered together with remains of soldiers of the Anglo Boer War. No. of Identified Casualties: 33 Warmbaths is about 100 miles north of Johhanesburg. Geyser would be the surname of the officer commanding this unit. Zandfontein refers to a farm in the Waterberg SA. Transvaal Rebellion Commandos Waterberg Geyser Mil.Dist.No.9 Eight men of Geysers Commando were killed at Zandfontein 8Nov1914 Two were killed 6Nov1914 as above. The Maritz Rebellion or the Boer Revolt or the Five Shilling Rebellion Die Burger:(Afrikaans: “The Citizen”), The word 'Burgher' comes from the Dutch/German word Vrij Burgher, meaning "free citizen" or "town's dweller", and is cognate with the French and English word "bourgeois ". Burgher - an enfranchised citizen of the South African Republic (Transvaal) during the years of its existence (1857 to 1900)

John Knox

Private in the 2nd.Batt.,Cameronians(Scottish Rifles).Born Kilmarnock.Service No.29154.Died of Wounds 28/3/1918.Age 32.Buried St.Server Cemetery Extension,Rouen,France.

Son of James Hamilton Knox and Margaret Hart King,Crookedholm,Hurlford and husband of Elizabeth Miller McCall.Grandson of Rosina Hamilton.

St Sever Cemetery and St. Sever Cemetery Extension are located within a large communal cemetery situated on the eastern edge of the southern Rouen suburbs of Le Grand Quevilly and Le Petit Quevilly. If approaching Rouen from the north, head for the centre of town and cross over the river Seine, following signs for Caen. Follow this route until you get to the 'Rond Point des Bruyeres' roundabout (next to the football stadium), then take the first exit into the Boulevard Stanislas Girardin. The cemetery is 150 metres down this road on the left. If approaching Rouen from the south, follow the N138 (Avenue des Canadiens) towards the centre of town. At the 'Rond Point des Bruyeres' roundabout (next to the football stadium), take the fourth exit into the Boulevard Stanislas Girardin. The cemetery is 150 metres down this road on the left. If arriving on foot, take the metro to St Sever Metro Station, then follow the Avenue de Caen until you get to the Avenue de la Liberation, then take this road and follow this, which will become the Boulevard du 11 Novembre. At the end of this road is the 'Rond Point des Bruyeres' roundabout. Take the first exit from this into the Boulevard Stanislas Girardin. The cemetery is 150 metres down this road on the left. Historical Information: During the First World War, Commonwealth camps and hospitals were stationed on the southern outskirts of Rouen. A base supply depot and the 3rd Echelon of General Headquarters were also established in the city. Almost all of the hospitals at Rouen remained there for practically the whole of the war. They included eight general, five stationary, one British Red Cross and one labour hospital, and No. 2 Convalescent Depot. A number of the dead from these hospitals were buried in other cemeteries, but the great majority were taken to the city cemetery of St. Sever. In September 1916, it was found necessary to begin an extension, where the last burial took place in April 1920. During the Second World War, Rouen was again a hospital centre and the extension was used once more for the burial of Commonwealth servicemen, many of whom died as prisoners of war during the German occupation. The cemetery extension contains 8,346 Commonwealth burials of the First World War (ten of them unidentified) and 328 from the Second World War (18 of them unidentified). There are also 8 Foreign National burials here. The extension was designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield.

Robert Lambie

Private in the 10th.Batt.,Cameronians(Scottish Rifles).Born Mauchline.Enlisted Lanark.Service No.41119.Formerly 683 Lanarkshire Yeomanary.Killed in Action 24/6/1917.Age 27.Buried Brandhoek Military Cemetery,Vlamertinghe,Ieper,West-Vlaanderen,Belgium.Grave l.K.42

Son of Robert and Agnes Davidson.Born at Mauchline,Ayrshire.Grandson of Joseph Walker Davidson and Margaret Grier.

Brandhoek Military Cemetery is located 6.5 km west of Ieper town centre on the Branderstraat, a road leading from the N308 connecting Ieper to Poperinge. From Ieper town centre the Poperingseweg (N308) is reached via Elverdingsestraat then directly over two small roundabouts in the J. Capronstraat. The Poperingseweg is a continuation of the J. Capronstraat and begins after a prominent railway level crossing. 6 km along the N308, after passing the village of Vlamertinge and just beyond the church in the hamlet of Brandhoek, lies the left hand turning onto the Grote Branderstraat. The cemetery is located 300 metres along the Branderstraat on the left hand side of the road, beyond the N38 dual carriageway, which it is necessary to cross. Historical Information: During the First World War, Brandhoek was within the area comparatively safe from shell fire which extended beyond Vlamertinghe Church. Field ambulances were posted there continuously and the Military Cemetery was opened early in May 1915 in a field adjoining the dressing station. It closed in July 1917 when the New Military Cemetery was opened nearby, to be followed by the New Military Cemetery No 3 in August 1917. Brandhoek Military Cemetery now contains 669 First World War burials. The cemetery was designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield. No. of Identified Casualties: 666

John Lavery

Private in the 25th(Tyneside Irish)Batt.,Northumberland Fusiliers.Enlisted Glasgow.Service No.59513.Died 24/4/1918.Age 23.Tyne Cot Memorial,Zonnebeke,West-Vlaanderen,Belgium.Panel 19 to 23 and 162.

Son of David Laverie and Margaret Dunbar,Glenburnie Cottage,Glenluce.Grandson of William Lavery and Esther Reid.

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Walter Keith Loughnan

Flight Sergeant in the Royal Australian Air Force.Service No.429465.Died 4/11/1944 over Germany.Age 20.Grave/Memorial Ref.5.B.20.Rheinberg War Cemetery.

Son of Walter Loughnan and Airlie Colleen Moore,Mitchell,Queensland.Gt.gt.grandson of Thomas Wilson and Agnes Johnston.

Rheinberg is 24 kilometres north of Krefeld and 13 kilometres south of Wesel. The cemetery is 3 kilometres south of the centre of the town of Rheinberg on the road to Kamp Lintfort. From the motorway 57, turn off at Rheinberg and at the T junction follow the B.510 (Rheinberger Strasse) in the direction Kamp Lintfort. The cemetery is a short way along this road on the right. Historical Information: The site of Rheinberg War Cemetery was chosen in April 1946 by the Army Graves Service for the assembly of Commonwealth graves recovered from numerous German cemeteries in the area. The majority of those now buried in the cemetery were airmen, whose graves were brought in from Dusseldorf, Krefeld, Munchen-Gladbach, Essen, Aachen and Dortmund; 450 graves were from Cologne alone. The men of the other fighting services buried here mostly lost their lives during the battle of the Rhineland, or in the advance from the Rhine to the Elbe. There are now 3,326 Commonwealth servicemen of the Second World War buried or commemorated at Rheinberg War Cemetery. 156 of the burials are unidentified. There are also nine war graves of other nationalities, most of them Polish

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James Smythe McAdam

Able Seaman,Royal Navy.Service No.D/JX 393070.Died 25Feb1944,age 20,when HMS Mahratta was torpedoed by a U-Boat in the Barents Sea,25Feb1944 on Convoy JW57.HMS Mahratta was a destroyer of 1920 tons commissioned 28Jul1942.

Memorial:Plymouth Naval Memorial.Panel 86,Column 3.

Son of John McAdam and Annie Goudie Easton,Dalrymple,Ayrshire.Descended from James Easton and Barbara Clerkston.

James Mackay

Lance Corporal in the 61st.Batt.,Machine Gun Corps(Inf).Born Dornoch.Enlisted Dornoch.Service No.23358.Formerly 578 Seaforth Highlanders.Awarded Military Medal.Killed in Action 1Nov1918.Age 22.Buried Valenciennes(St.Roch) Communal Cemetery,Nord,Francce. Grave lll.E.12.

Son of Kenneth Mackay and Johana Sutherland,Schoolhill,Dornoch.Great grandson of John Mackay and Christina Bannerman.

VALENCIENNES (ST. ROCH) COMMUNAL CEMETERY Country: France Locality: Nord Visiting Information: OPENING TIMES: November - February: 08.00 - 17.00 March - September: 08.00 - 18.00 October: 08.00 - 17.30 Wheelchair access to the cemetery is possible, but may be by alternative entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on 01628 507200. Location Information: Valenciennes (St Roch) Communal Cemetery is situated on the north-east side of Valenciennes, about 1.5 kilometres from the centre. It is on the north side of the road to Bruay-sur-L'Escaut. Historical Information: Valenciennes remained in German hands from the early days of the First World War until 1-2 November 1918, when it was entered and cleared by the Canadian Corps; 5,000 civilians were found in the town. In November and December 1918, the 2nd, 57th, 4th Canadian and 32nd Casualty Clearing Stations were posted at Valenciennes and the last of them did not leave until October 1919. The Communal Cemetery of St. Roch was used by the Germans in August and September 1914 and an extension was then made on the south-east side. The Commonwealth plots were made adjoining the German: I and II contain the graves of October 1918 to December 1919; III, IV, V and part of VI contain the graves of 348 soldiers buried originally in the German Extension and 226 whose bodies were brought from other cemeteries or from the battlefields. The German Extension has since been removed and the Commonwealth plots are within the enlarged Communal Cemetery. The cemetery now contains 885 Commonwealth burials and commemorations of the First World War. 37 of the burials are unidentified. Special memorials commemorate 19 casualties who died as prisoners of war, of whom nine are buried here (Plot IV, Row A.) and ten at Le Quesnoy Communal Cemetery Extension, none of whom could be individually identified; all are therefore commemorated at both sites. Other special memorials record the names of seven soldiers buried in other cemeteries whose graves could not be found. The cemetery also contains 34 burials from the Second World War, all but one of them airmen. An interesting feature from the 1939-45 War, is a memorial tablet of white marble affixed to the outside wall of the shelter building, commemorating the Commission's former gardener, the late Robert Armstrong. An ex-Irish Guardsman, Mr. Armstrong held an Eire passport and, as a neutral, was allowed to continue at work in the cemetery after the outbreak of war. His sympathies impelled him to assist Allied soldiers and airmen to escape, and he was arrested by the Germans at the end of 1943. The original death sentence was commuted to 15 years imprisonment, and he was deported to Germany, dying at Waldheim Camp, Saxony, in December, 1944. For his help to Allied escapees he was posthumously awarded the Medaille de Resistance Francaise, and the tablet was a voluntary token of remembrance from the people of Valenciennes and the surrounding district. No. of Identified Casualties: 882

Adrian McKerlie

Private in the Australian Infantry A.I.F.2/3 M.G.Bn.Service No.SX6344.Died 24/6/1944.Grave Singapore Memorial Column 138.

Son of James McKerlie and Maggie Holmes and grandson of Robert McKelie and Mary Hannah

SINGAPORE MEMORIAL Country: Singapore Locality: unspecified Visiting Information: Kranji War Cemetery, in which the Memorial is located, is constructed on a hill with the means of access being via three flights of steps rising over four metres from the road level, which makes wheelchair access to this site impossible. Location Information: The Memorial stands in Kranji War Cemetery. Kranji War Cemetery is 22 kilometres north of the city of Singapore, on the north side of Singapore Island overlooking the Straits of Johore. It is just off the Singapore-Johore road (Woodlands road) at milestone 13 1/2 and there is a short approach road from the main road. The Cemetery is known locally as Kranji Memorial, and one must be sure of the address before boarding a taxi as many taxi drivers do not know the Cemetery. There are also bus stops on the main road facing the Cemetery and an MRT terminal is under construction a short distance from the Cemetery. Historical Information: Before 1939 the Kranji area was a military camp and at the time of the Japanese invasion of Malaya, it was the site of a large ammunition magazine. On 8 February 1942, the Japanese crossed the Johore Straits in strength, landing at the mouth of the Kranji River within two miles of the place where the war cemetery now stands. On the evening of 9 February, they launched an attack between the river and the causeway. During the next few days fierce fighting ensued, in many cases hand to hand, until their greatly superior numbers and air strength necessitated a withdrawal. After the fall of the island, the Japanese established a prisoner of war camp at Kranji and eventually a hospital was organised nearby at Woodlands. After the reoccupation of Singapore, the small cemetery started by the prisoners at Kranji was developed into a permanent war cemetery by the Army Graves Service when it became evident that a larger cemetery at Changi could not remain undisturbed. Changi had been the site of the main prisoner of war camp in Singapore and a large hospital had been set up there by the Australian Infantry Force. In 1946, the graves were moved from Changi to Kranji, as were those from the Buona Vista prisoner of war camp. Many other graves from all parts of the island were transferred to Kranji together with all Second World War graves from Saigon Military Cemetery in French Indo-China (now Vietnam), another site where permanent maintenance could not be assured. The Commission later brought in graves of both World Wars from Bidadari Christian Cemetery, Singapore, where again permanent maintenance was not possible. There are now 4,458 Commonwealth casualties of the Second World War buried or commemorated at KRANJI WAR CEMETERY. More than 850 of the burials are unidentified. The Chinese Memorial in Plot 44 marks a collective grave for 69 Chinese servicemen, all members of the Commonwealth forces, who were killed by the Japanese during the occupation in February 1942. First World War burials and commemorations number 64, including special memorials to three casualties known to have been buried in civil cemeteries in Saigon and Singapore, but whose graves could not be located. Within Kranji War Cemetery stands the SINGAPORE MEMORIAL, bearing the names of over 24,000 casualties of the Commonwealth land and air forces who have no known grave. Many of these have no known date of death and are accorded within our records the date or period from when they were known to be missing or captured. The land forces commemorated by the memorial died during the campaigns in Malaya and Indonesia or in subsequent captivity, many of them during the construction of the Burma-Thailand railway, or at sea while being transported into imprisonment elsewhere. The memorial also commemorates airmen who died during operations over the whole of southern and eastern Asia and the surrounding seas and oceans. The SINGAPORE (UNMAINTAINABLE GRAVES) MEMORIAL, which stands at the western end of the Singapore Memorial, commemorates more than 250 casualties who died in campaigns in Singapore and Malaya, whose known graves in civil cemeteries could not be assured maintenance and on religious grounds could not be moved to a war cemetery. The SINGAPORE CREMATION MEMORIAL, which stands immediately behind the Singapore Memorial, commemorates almost 800 casualties, mostly of the Indian forces, whose remains were cremated in accordance with their religious beliefs. The SINGAPORE CIVIL HOSPITAL GRAVE MEMORIAL stands at the eastern end of the Singapore Memorial. During the last hours of the Battle of Singapore, wounded civilians and servicemen taken prisoner by the Japanese were brought to the hospital in their hundreds. The number of fatalities was such that burial in the normal manner was impossible. Before the war, an emergency water tank had been dug in the grounds of the hospital and this was used as a grave for more than 400 civilians and Commonwealth servicemen. After the war, it was decided that as individual identification of the dead would be impossible, the grave should be left undisturbed. The grave was suitably enclosed, consecrated by the Bishop of Singapore, and a cross in memory of all of those buried there was erected over it by the military authorities. The 107 Commonwealth casualties buried in the grave are commemorated on the Singapore Civil Hospital Grave Memorial. Kranji War Cemetery and the Singapore Memorial were designed by Colin St Clair Oakes. Adjoining Kranji War Cemetery is KRANJI MILITARY CEMETERY, a substantial non-world war site of 1,378 burials, created in 1975 when it was found necessary to remove the graves of servicemen and their families from Pasir Panjang and Ulu Pandan cemeteries. No. of Identified Casualties: 24313.

James McKerlie

Private in the Australian Infantry A.I.F.2/4 Bn.Service No.WX22066.Died 28/5/1945.Grave Lae War Cemetery M.M.B.11.

Son of James McKerlie and Maggie Holmes and grandson of Robert McKelie and Mary Hannah

LAE WAR CEMETERY Country: Papua New Guinea Locality: unspecified Location Information: Lae is a town and port at the mouth of the Markham River on the Huon Gulf. Lae War Cemetery is located adjacent to the Botanical Gardens in the centre of Lae. Historical Information: In the early months of 1942, Japan enjoyed a crushing superiority in the air, and it was Lae and its neighbouring airfields that were the objects of the first Japanese attack on New Guinea. Lae and Salamaua were bombed on 21 January 1942 by 100 planes, but the land forces did not enter the territory until 7 March, when 3,000 Japanese landed at Lae. There were landings too at Salamaua, followed on 21 July by further landings at Buna and Gona on the east coast in preparation for a drive through the Owen Stanley Mountains across the Papuan peninsula to Port Moresby. The vital stage of the New Guinea campaign dates from that time. Lae became one of the bases from which the southward drive was launched and maintained until it was stopped at Ioribaiwa Ridge, a point within 60 kilometres of Port Moresby. LAE WAR CEMETERY was commenced in 1944 by the Australian Army Graves Service and handed over to the Commission in 1947. It contains the graves of men who lost their lives during the New Guinea campaign whose graves were brought here from the temporary military cemeteries in areas where the fighting took place. The Indian casualties were soldiers of the army of undivided India who had been taken prisoner during the fighting in Malaya and Hong Kong. The great majority of the unidentified were recovered between But airfield and Wewak, where they had died while employed in working parties. Of the two men belonging to the army of the United Kingdom, one was attached to 2/9th Australian Infantry Battalion and the other was a member of the Hong Kong-Singapore Royal Artillery. The naval casualties were killed, or died of injuries received, on H.M. Ships King George V, Glenearn and Empire Arquebus, and the four men of the Merchant Navy were killed when the S.S. Gorgon was bombed and damaged in Milne Bay in April 1943. The cemetery contains 2,818 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War, 444 of them unidentified. Prior to the First World War, north-eastern New Guinea and certain adjacent islands were German possessions, and were occupied by Australian Forces on 12 September 1914. Several cemeteries in New Guinea contain the graves of men who died during that war. There is one such grave in Lae War Cemetery, brought in from a burial ground where permanent maintenance could not be assured. The LAE MEMORIAL, which stands in the cemetery, commemorates more than 300 officers and men of the Australian Army, the Australian Merchant Navy and the Royal Australian Air Force who lost their lives in these operations and have no known grave. Casualties of the Royal Australian Navy who lost their lives in the south-western Pacific region, and have no known grave but the sea, are commemorated on Plymouth Naval Memorial in England along with many of their comrades of the Royal Navy and of other Commonwealth Naval Forces. No. of Identified Casualties: 2375 This figure includes

Donald McDonald Munro

Private in the 1st/5th.Batt.,Seaforth Highlanders.Enlisted Inverness.Service No.S/11411.Died 28/8/1918.Age 32.Buried Terlincthun British Cemetery,Wimille,France.Plot 2.Row E.Grave 47.

Son of George Munro and Jane McDonald,32 Madras Street,Inverness.Grandson of Hugh Munro and Marion Mackay.

Terlincthun British Cemetery is situated on the northern outskirts of Boulogne. From Calais follow the A16 to Boulogne, come off at Junction 3 and follow the D96E for Wimereux Sud. Continue on this road for approximately 1 kilometre when the Cemetery will be found on the left hand side of the road. However, it should be noted that the entrance to the cemetery is in St Martin's Road, which is the road on the left immediately after the cemetery. Historical Information: The first rest camps for Commonwealth forces were established near Terlincthun in August 1914 and during the whole of the First World War, Boulogne and Wimereux housed numerous hospitals and other medical establishments. The cemetery at Terlincthun was begun in June 1918 when the space available for service burials in the civil cemeteries of Boulogne and Wimereux was exhausted. It was used chiefly for burials from the base hospitals, but Plot IV Row C contains the graves of 46 RAF personnel killed at Marquise in September 1918 in a bombing raid by German aircraft. In July 1920, the cemetery contained more than 3,300 burials, but for many years Terlincthun remained an 'open' cemetery and graves continued to be brought into it from isolated sites and other burials grounds throughout France where maintenance could not be assured. During the Second World War, there was heavy fighting in the area in 1940. Wimille was devastated when, from 22 - 25 May, the garrison at Boulogne fought a spirited delaying action covering the withdrawal to Dunkirk. There was some fighting in Wimille again in 1944. The cemetery suffered considerable damage both from the shelling in 1940 and under the German occupation. The cemetery now contains 4,378 Commonwealth burials of the First World War and more than 200 war graves of other nationalities, most of them German. Second World War burials number 149. The cemetery was designed by Sir Herbert Baker. No. of Identified Casualties: 3879

Alexander Parker

Gunner in "A"By.148th.Bde.,Royal Field Artillery.Enlisted Stranraer.Service No.133831.Died of wounds 7/10/1916.Age 23.Buried Grave A11 Longueval Road Cemetery.

Son of Alexander Parker and Jane Clanachan,Dunragit,Wigtownshire.GtGtGrandson of Andrew Matthews and Agnes McKerlie.

LONGUEVAL ROAD CEMETERY.Longueval is a village in the Department of the Somme, 11 kilometres east of Albert. Travel north-east from Albert on the D929 in the direction of Bapaume. After 10 kilometres take the D6 in the direction of Martinpuich and follow signs for Longueval. From Longueval crossroads continue in the direction of Maricourt, D197, for 800 metres. Longueval Road Cemetery is situated on the left hand side of the road. Historical Information: Longueval was the scene of furious fighting in 1916, lasting from 14 to 29 July, when the village was cleared by the 5th Division. It was lost in March 1918, and retaken by the 38th (Welsh) Division and the Carabineers on 28 August 1918. Longueval Road Cemetery was begun in September 1915, near a dressing station known as "Longueval Alley", or "Longueval Water Point". It was used until January 1917 but further burials were made in August and September 1918. At the Armistice, the cemetery contained 171 graves and others were brought in from a wide area round Longueval in 1923-24. Longueval Road Cemetery now contains 222 burials and commemorations of the First World War. 48 of the burials are unidentified but there are special memorials to three soldiers known or believed to be buried among them. There is also one German burial in the cemetery. The cemetery was designed by A J S Hutton. No. of Identified Casualties: 175

John David Ross

Private in the 19th.Batt.,Canadian Infantry(Central Ontario Regiment).Service No.454171.Died 15/8/1917.Age 25.Buried Lapugnoy Military Cemetery,Pas de Calais,France.Grave V.B.10.

Son of Angus and Georgina Ross,Embo,Dornoch,Sutherland.

Lapugnoy is a village 6 kilometres west of Bethune. From the centre of Lapugnoy, head south-west on the D70 in the direction of Marles-les-Mines. On the outskirts there is a crucifix at the side of the main road, turn right here towards Allouagne. After approximately 500 metres there is a track on the left hand side (the Cemetery is signposted here) and the Cemetery can be found on the left hand side, approximately 500 metres, along this track. Historical Information: The first burials were made in Plot I of the cemetery in September 1915, but it was most heavily used during the Battle of Arras, which began in April 1917. The dead were brought to the cemetery from casualty clearing stations, chiefly the 18th and the 23rd at Lapugnoy and Lozinghem, but between May and August 1918 the cemetery was used by fighting units. Lapugnoy Military Cemetery contains 1,323 Commonwealth burials of the First World War and 11 from the Second World War, all dating from May 1940. The cemetery was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens. No. of Identified Casualties: 1333

Wentworth Frederick Scott

Private No.12608 Date of Death 10/08/1917 11th.Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers United Kingdom Panel 33. YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL

Husband of Agnes Davidson Wilson McDowall who was a grand-daughter of Thomas Wilson and Agnes Davidson.

John Jasper Spowart

Private in the 2nd.Batt.Otago Regiment, N.Z.E.F. Service No.24/1821.Died 4/4/1918.Age 30.Killed in the 2nd.Battle of the Somme 21Mar/6Apr1918. Buried Martinsart British Cemetery,Somme, France.

Son of David Spowart and Janet Christie, 28 Erskine Street,Alloa,Scotland.Janet Christie is the daughter of William Christie and Janet Durie

Martinsart is a small village 4 kilometres north of Albert.The cemetery is on the south side of the village on the road (D129) to Aveluy. The cemetery is signposted in the centre of Martinsart Historical Information:Martinsart was close to the Allied front line until September 1916, and again from March to August 1918. Martinsart Cemetery was begun at the end of June 1916, when 14 men of the 13th Royal Irish Rifles, killed by a shell, were buried in what is now Plot I, Row A. It was used as a front-line cemetery until October 1916 and again in September 1918, when bodies were brought in from the battlefields for burial by V Corps. After the Armistice, the cemetery was enlarged when more graves were brought in from the area north, east and south of the village. There are now 488 First World War servicemen buried or commemorated in the cemetery. 155 of the burials are unidentified but special memorials commemorate six casualties believed to be buried among them. The cemetery is unusual in that the graves are marked by stones made from red Corsehill or Locharbriggs sandstone, rather than the more usual Portland stone. The cemetery was designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield No. of Identified Casualties:333.

John Young Steele

Merchant seaman.Killed 29/6/1942 when his ship was torpedoed of Florida..Age 34.

Son of Joseph Steele and Mary Logan and gt.gt.gt.grandson of John Gillon and Grace Simpson

Died when his ship the S.S.Empire Mica,a British Merchant oil tanker,was torpedeod of the Florida coast in 1942 by the U67. STEELE, Third Engineer Officer, JOSEPH YOUNG, S.S. Empire Mica (Middlesbrough). Merchant Navy. 29th June 1942. Age 34. King's Commendation for Brave Conduct. Son of Joseph Young Steele and Mary Steele; husband of Annie Weir Steele, of Paisley, Renfrewshire The "Battle of the Atlantic", has been described as the world's longest battle, spanning the entire Second World War. During these years of the war, Merchant ships ran a daily struggle for survival, against Hitler's submarines. The Merchant navy was vital for Britain's war effort, and was, and still is, "The Forgotten Fourth Force". The ships carried all types of cargo, from food and raw materials, to troops and equipment. Hitler knew that the best way of winning the war, was to have Britain starve, and her war machine grind to a halt from the lack of supplies. The best way of achieving his aim, was to sink as many merchant ships as possible. Any battle on land, or in the air, was only as good as the supplies that the respected forces had, and the bulk of these supplies, came via the Merchant Navy. Between June 1940 and the end of the year, U-boats, supplemented by mines, aircraft and surface ships, succeeded in sinking three million tons of Allied shipping. During the course of the war 4,786 merchant ships were lost and over 30,000 British Merchant Marines were killed. This web page is dedicated to just one of those ships and to her crew. www.http://homepage.eircom.net/~gordonsteele/index.html He,along with 32 others died on the 29th June 1942, when their ship, the Empire Mica was hit and sunk, by two torpedoes from the German submarine, U67.

John Stewart

Private in the 17th.Australian Infantry Battalion.Service No.330.Killed in action 27Aug1915 Hill 60 Gallipoli.Age 25 Memorial Lone Pine Memorial,Gallipoli.

Son of Adam Crawford Stewart and Margaret Davidson and grandson of Joseph Walker Davidson.

Cemetery: LONE PINE MEMORIAL Country: Turkey Visiting Information: Wheelchair access to the cemetery is possible via the main entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on 01628 507200. Location Information: The Lone Pine Memorial is at the east end of Lone Pine Cemetery. The Anzac and Suvla cemeteries are first signposted from the left hand junction of the Eceabat - Bigali road. From this junction you should travel into the main Anzac area. At 7.6kms., take a right turn to Chunuk Bair and initially take the road to Kemalyeri. At 10.3kms, Lone Pine will be found on the left. Lone Pine Cemetery stand on the plateau at the top of Victoria Gully. Historical Information: The eight month campaign in Gallipoli was fought by Commonwealth and French forces in an attempt to force Turkey out of the war, to relieve the deadlock of the Western Front in France and Belgium, and to open a supply route to Russia through the Dardanelles and the Black Sea. The Allies landed on the peninsula on 25-26 April 1915; the 29th Division at Cape Helles in the south and the Australian and New Zealand Corps north of Gaba Tepe on the west coast, an area soon known as Anzac. On 6 August, further landings were made at Suvla, just north of Anzac, and the climax of the campaign came in early August when simultaneous assaults were launched on all three fronts. Lone Pine was a strategically important plateau in the southern part of Anzac which was briefly in the hands of Australian forces following the landings on 25 April. It became a Turkish strong point from May to July, when it was known by them as 'Kanli Sirt' (Bloody Ridge). The Australians pushed mines towards the plateau from the end of May to the beginning of August and on the afternoon of 6 August, after mine explosions and bombardment from land and sea, the position was stormed by the 1st Australian Brigade. By 10 August, the Turkish counter-attacks had failed and the position was consolidated. It was held by the 1st Australian Division until 12 September, and then by the 2nd, until the evacuation of the peninsula in December. The LONE PINE MEMORIAL stands on the site of the fiercest fighting at Lone Pine and overlooks the whole front line of May 1915. It commemorates more than 4,900 Australian and New Zealand servicemen who died in the Anzac area - the New Zealanders prior to the fighting in August 1915 - whose graves are not known. Others named on the memorial died at sea and were buried in Gallipoli waters. The memorial stands in LONE PINE CEMETERY. The original small battle cemetery was enlarged after the Armistice when scattered graves were brought in from the neighbourhood, and from Brown's Dip North and South Cemeteries, which were behind the Australian trenches of April-August 1915. There are now 1,167 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated in this cemetery. 504 of the burials are unidentified. Special memorials commemorate 183 soldiers (all but one of them Australian, most of whom died in August), who were known or believed to have been buried in Lone Pine Cemetery, or in the cemeteries at Brown's Dip. No. of Identified Casualties: 4933 This figure includes Foreign and Non-World War graves in CWGC care

James Tagg

Engine Room Artificer in the Royal Canadian Navy Volunteer Reserve.Service No.V/24237.Killed in Action 20/9/1943.Age 43.Halifax Memorial Panel 10.

Son of Robert Tagg and Janet McLean.Great grandson of James Tagg and Anne Reid

HMCS St. Croix (Lt.Cdr. A.H. Dobson, R.C.N.R., DSC) was torpedoed and sunk south of Iceland on the 20Sep1943 by U-305 while escorting convoy ON.202. The ship was one of the first victims of the new developed acoustic torpedo Gnat. Of the 5 officers and 76 men picked up by the British frigate HMS Itchen (sunk by German U-boat U-666), only one survived the sinking of the Itchen a few days later.

Matthew Knowles Thorburn

Private,1st.Battalion,Australian Infantry.Service No.5239 Son of James Thorburn and his wife Mary Ann Knowles, of 35, Grove St., Balmain, New South Wales.His great great grandparents were Thomas Johnston and Mary Park.

Name on Villers-Bretonneux Memorial. Killed in action.Buried about 450 yards N.N.W. of Gueudecourt. Killed by machine gun fire in the Flers charge. His body and several others were found just in front of Bayonet trench on the 3Mar1917. He was buried in a shell hole where he was lying. The paybooks,discs etc. were taken from the bodies and handed in to the battalion. From Australian Army Archives.

VILLERS-BRETONNEUX MEMORIAL Country: France Locality: unspecified Visiting Information: Access to the tower at the memorial will be restricted during bad weather conditions. During working hours wheelchair access to Villers-Bretonneux Cemetery, in which the memorial stands, is possible by an alternative entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on 01628 507200. The names are engraved on the memorial in order of battalion, then alphabetically under rank. Location Information: Villers-Bretonneux is a village 16 kilometres east of Amiens on the straight main road to St Quentin. The Memorial stands in Villers-Bretonneux Military Cemetery, which is about 2 kilometres north of the village on the east side of the road to Fouilloy. Historical Information: Villers-Bretonneux became famous in 1918, when the German advance on Amiens ended in the capture of the village by their tanks and infantry on 23 April. On the following day, the 4th and 5th Australian Divisions, with units of the 8th and 18th Divisions, recaptured the whole of the village and on 8 August 1918, the 2nd and 5th Australian Divisions advanced from its eastern outskirts in the Battle of Amiens. The VILLERS-BRETONNEUX MEMORIAL is the Australian national memorial erected to commemorate all Australian soldiers who fought in France and Belgium during the First World War, to their dead, and especially to those of the dead whose graves are not known. The 10,770 Australian servicemen actually named on the memorial died in the battlefields of the Somme, Arras, the German advance of 1918 and the Advance to Victory. The memorial was unveiled by King George VI in July 1938. The memorial stands within VILLERS-BRETONNEUX MILITARY CEMETERY, which was made after the Armistice when graves were brought in from other burial grounds in the area and from the battlefields. Plots I to XX were completed by 1920 and contain mostly Australian graves, almost all from the period March to August 1918. Plots IIIA, VIA, XIIIA and XVIA, and Rows in other Plots lettered AA, were completed by 1925, and contain a much larger proportion of unidentified graves brought from a wider area. Later still, 444 graves were brought in from Dury Hospital Military Cemetery. There are now 2,141 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated in this cemetery. 608 of the burials are unidentified but there are special memorials to five casualties known or believed to be buried among them, and to 15 buried in other cemeteries whose graves could not be found on concentration. The cemetery also contains the graves of two New Zealand airmen of the Second World War. Both cemetery and memorial were designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens

John Wilson

Rank:Private.Service No:916 Date of Death:20/09/1914 Age:25 Died of his wounds in the Hotel Majestic,Paris.Regiment/Service:Black Watch (Royal Highlanders) 1st Bn. Grave Reference:19. I. A. 9.Cemetery:CITY OF PARIS CEMETERY, BAGNEUX

Youngest son of John and Christina Wilson; husband of Catherine B. Rushton (formerly Wilson), of 3, Appin Terrace, Slateford Rd., Edinburgh. Born at Blackford, Perthshire.Catherine was born Catherine Beveridge Hunter and was a gt grandchild of John Mackay and Christina Bannerman.

City of Paris Cemetery,Bagneux.Country:FranceLocality:Hauts-de-SeineIdentified Casualties:35 Location Information This is a large metropolitan cemetery to the south of the city in the suburb of Bagneux. From the railway station take the Avenue Mark Dormoy. Continue straight on until you reach the second set of traffic lights when the cemetery entrance will be found on the right. Near the east corner of the cemetery are two small Commonwealth plots. Historical Information The British War Graves in the neighbourhood of Paris fall into three main groups. The earliest are those of soldiers who died of wounds in French and British hospitals in or near Paris in 1914, when the ambulance trains ran South-Westward from the Aisne and the Marne. The second group is due to the presence of British troops in the Aisne and the Marne in the summer of 1918. The third is a number of graves of men who died after the Armistice. In the 19th Division, near the East corner, are two small Commonwealth Plots. There are now over 30, 1914-18 and a small number of 1939-45 war casualties commemorated in this site. The plots cover an area of 133 square metres.

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